Microbiome-Centric Interventions for Pet Health Conditions

Puppy and kitten

A healthy and balanced microbiome is a resilient microbiome that resists dysbiosis and helps protect the host from infection and other stresses, improving long-term host health.1

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Putting microbiome science into practice to build a more resilient microbiome

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Probiotics improve balance, diversity and resilience

The science

A diverse microbiome is necessary for resilience.1E. faecium SF68 was associated with higher levels of Bifidobacteria and lower levels of Clostridium perfringens, indicating a more balanced microbiome in kittens receiving the probiotic.2

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Putting the science into practice

The probiotic E. faecium SF68 favors resilience in the kitten microbiome.

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Healthy weight builds resilience

The science

Obese dogs and cats experience larger shifts in the microbiome in response to dietary changes, indicating they have a less stable and resilient microbiome.3,4

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Putting the science into practice

Maintaining a healthy weight has a protective effect on the microbiome’s resilience.

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Prebiotics promote resilience

The science

Dogs fed chicory or FOS had significantly more fecal Bifidobacteria, fewer fecal Clostridia, and increased levels of beneficial short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs).5 SCFAs promote gut health through numerous processes.6

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Putting the science into practice

Prebiotics such as inulin or fructooligosaccharide promote a resilient microbiome.

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Probiotic preserves microbiome in the face of stress in cats

The science

In addition to the immune benefits of E. faecium SF68 seen in cats with latent herpesvirus infections, supplementation with the probiotic preserved gut microbial diversity when cats were exposed to minor stresses (e.g., housing changes, neutering).7,8

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Putting the science into practice

The probiotic E. faecium SF68 improves vaccine response and long-term immune functions in growing dogs without overstimulating the immune system.

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Probiotic reduced exercise-induced stress in dogs

The science

The probiotic strain Bacillus coagulans GBI-30 6086 (BC30) reduced C-reactive protein in serum of sled dogs undergoing exercise-induced stress.9

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Putting the science into practice

The probiotic strain BC30 improves the exercise-induced stress response in dogs.

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  1. Pilla, R., & Suchodolski, J. S. (2021). The gut microbiome of dogs and cats, and the influence of diet. Veterinary Clinics of North America Small Animal Practice, 51(3), 605–621. doi: 10.1016/j.cvsm.2021.01.002
  2. Czarnecki-Maulden, G. L., Cavadini, C., Lawler, D. F. & Benyacoub, J. (2007). Incidence of naturally occurring diarrhea in kittens fed Enterococcus faecium SF68. Compendium: Continuing Education for Veterinarians (Supplement), 29 (2A), 37.
  3. Li, Q. & Pan, Y. (2020). Differential responses to dietary protein and carbohydrate ratio on gut microbiome in obese vs lean cats. Frontiers in Microbiology. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2020.591462
  4. Li, Q., Lauber, C. L., Czarnecki-Maulden, G., Pan Y., & Hannah, S. S. (2017). Effects of the dietary protein and carbohydrate ratio on gut microbiomes in dogs of different body conditions. MBio, 8(1), e01703. doi:10.1128/mBio.01703.16
  5. Czarnecki-Maulden, G. L., & Russell, T. J. (2000). Effect of chicory on fecal microflora in dogs fed soy-containing or soy-free diets. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, 14(4), A488.
  6. Cunningham, M., Azcarate-Peril, M. A., Barnard, A., Benoit, V., Grimaldi, R., Guyonnet, D.,…Gibson, G. R. (2021). Shaping the future of probiotics and prebiotics. Trends in Microbiology, 29(8), 667—685. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2021.01.003
  7. Lappin, M. R., Veir, J. K., Satyaraj, E. & Czarnecki-Maulden, G. (2009). Pilot study to evaluate the effect of oral supplementation of Enterococcus faecium SF68 on cats with latent herpesvirus 1. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. doi:10.1016/j.jfms.2008.12.006
  8. Lappin, M. R., Coy, J., Hawley, J. & Dow, S. Effect of a commercially available probiotic on immune responses in healthy dogs. Presented at: American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine; June 8-10, 2017; National Harbor, Maryland. Abstract NM05 201
  9. Internal data, 2018